2018 Board of Directors Candidates

Six Noble Gentlemen have filed for positions on the Board of Directors: Two for President-Elect as well as Director-at-Large and four for Director-at-Large. Candidate filing for election is now closed since more have filed for the number of positions open. More information about each candidate can be found below.

President-Elect Candidates:
Jeremy Daus, Wisconsin – River Falls
Jeremiah King, Missouri S&T

Director-at-Large Candidates:
Jeremy Daus, Wisconsin – River Falls
Joseph Gallo, Michigan Tech.
Scott Kaspar, Illinois
Jeremiah King, Missouri S&T
Mike Ray, Youngstown State
Paul Phillips III, Southeastern Louisiana

The election process will be similar to prior years with each nominated candidate addressing the House of Delegates during the time allotted for their own statement and through a Candidates Forum question and answer format session. A major difference from prior years is that a Nominating Committee will put before the House of Delegates candidates for these positions. More detailed information about the election process is available below in the linked documents.

More information about the Board of Directors and its duties and responsibilities is available below.

Board of Directors Responsibilities Obligations and Expectations 2018

Any questions about the election process may be directed to Senior Past President and Election Commission Chairman Tom Morgan, Southeastern Louisiana, at noblemen@sigtau.org.

Jeremy Daus

Wisconsin - River Falls '96 Capella Education Company: Senior Manager - Product Development and Portfolio Strategy

Jeremy Daus served as Scholarship Chair, Alumni Relations Chair, Social Chair, Safewalk Chair, IFC representative and was twice elected as Executive Vice President as an undergraduate member of the Gamma Nu Chapter (University of Wisconsin – River Falls). As an alumnus, he served undergraduates as a Chapter Counselor, Alumni Advisor, District Director, Regional Vice President and Vice President of Philanthropy. Through all of his roles, Daus has focused on ways to enhance the undergraduate members’ experience. He is a Notable Morris Fellow of the Wilson C. Morris Fellowship of honored Foundation donors.

Q: Over the past decade, Sig Tau has taken many steps to build a strong foundation for a successful future. What action(s) by the Fraternity in recent years do you believe is (are) the most critical to it building a strong, successful future? What are the implications of that action?
A: Practically for a member (undergrad or alumnus), financial forecasting isn’t the most exciting topic, but I can tell you that its importance is critical to Sig Tau’s future. The Board has taken steps to take a different view of organizational financials where we don’t just focus on a year-to-year budget, but to frame out our organization’s finances 2-5 years into the future. With this sort of information, we can better set goals/objectives for the organization and base them not just upon what we want to do this year, but what we want to do in the
future. We can better assess how to make investments in the organization as well as have a compliment to the Strategic Plan (i.e. how we finance where we want to go). We all can see the benefit in ensuring we continue to grow. STG needs to continue to set itself apart in how we share our Brotherhood. Without a strong Brotherhood (i.e. what we show future members who we want to become Sig Tau’s), we will not be successful (i.e. expand membership growth). It is critical that we do all we can to live our Mission and Purpose and ensure we continue to grow the size of our current chapters as well as expand to new campuses. We’ve grown so much already…but we need to keep growing now, more than ever.

Q: What do you believe is the most critical external challenge faced by the Fraternity? How should Sig Tau position itself to successfully deal with this challenge?
A: The biggest challenge all Fraternities face is the bad culture, of bad chapters and the bad decisions they make. What’s worst about these bad groups potentially impact lives of their members/members families, forever. My worst nightmare is when I read news of another fraternity who’s lost another member, or a group is in trouble at their campus for a bad decision made in that chapter. Sigma Tau Gamma chapters and members need to be better than that, because we care for our Brothers. Fraternities that make bad decisions are killing us all…Sigma Tau Gamma needs to rise up and be the Courageous and Noble Gentlemen we claim to be. Our members should lead by example in how we conduct ourselves. We need to ensure we make a positive contribution to the world around us. If we really are a Brotherhood of Courageous and Noble Gentlemen, we need to act that way, all the time. We cannot allow our Brotherhood be cheapened by members who do not respect our beliefs, our principles and each other.

Q: What career or life experiences you have had that would most beneficially contribute to the deliberations and decisions of the Board?
A: In my professional life, I’ve worked hard to reach a position in which I am mostly in control of the work I do. It’s given me insights and skills in how to run a business in a fast-paced, highly regulated industry. I am a results-oriented, brand manager with proven ability to lead teams, who finds ways to get the most from employees, while helping them grow in their roles and refine their skills. My role is also to understand the market in which we do business. From offering the correct products to understanding what the next 5-10 years will bring, my role is to ensure short and long term financial results for the company. I am adept at managing the P&L of an organization and aligning the organizations strategy and produce results. I am responsible for strategic planning for my business unit as well as its results and everything in between. As this relates to Sigma Tau Gamma, I am able to contribute as a Board Member, because I understand the inner workings of an organizational management. I am able to quickly associate and understand what the CEO, other Board members and external sources share and then develop strategic plans to enable organizational success. As President-Elect, I will be counsel to the CEO and a chairman for the Board and will ensure we conduct ourselves in a forward-looking way, thinking of what comes next for Sigma Tau Gamma…setting the stage for our next 100 years.

Q: What item(s) in the 2020 Strategic Plan do you think is (are) most important? What item(s) would you change?
A: To me, everything is derivative of the Vision and Purpose of the organization, so they should serve as keystone to whatever we do. If we hold tight to these ideals, we need only think about where we want the organization to go. In terms of what I’d change, that’s the best part of the Strategic Plan. It is not a static document and needs to be updated/changed to ensure that the organization is considering the forces outside of the organization to deliver upon our Vision and Purpose. What needs to change from a Board perspective is how we link up the CEO’s instructions from the Board to the day-to-day operations that drive us toward our goals/objectives. Currently, we see growth, parent/alumni engagement, membership development, operations, foundation and WPN as the priorities. I believe we need to keep all of these, yet refine them. The Board has been working on the instructions we give to the CEO, in what we believe are the priorities he should focus upon. They show that refinement. They are in draft form, but focus upon engagement of members to solicit and implement the feedback they give, member development/chapter service to ensure that tools and resources are at the disposal of those who need them, financial sustainability to ensure the organization’s long-term health, member safety to show enable our members care for one another, operational excellence to ensure the organization is poised to operate at peak performance, and organizational growth so that we can grow in that critical area I identified in my first response. A refinement of our organizational priorities are not a re-working of them all, but refinement to ensure we’re staying current with external forces as well as planning for our next 100 years.

Q: If you could ask a candidate for the Board any one question, what would it be? Please provide your own answer to that question.
Q: What characteristics set you apart from other Brothers who seek to be President Elect?
A: I bring two things to the table, one not unlike anyone who chooses to represent the Grand Chapter and the other is something which has served me well in my career. Like all brothers, a love of Sigma Tau Gamma makes me want to serve the organization. I’ve spent 4 years on the board, 12 years as a Regional Volunteer and I can say that my love of Sig Tau has been strengthened as we’ve had to make hard decisions about the future of the organization. What my love of Sig Tau brings out is my passion for this organization and its members. You ask anyone who’s worked with me and they’ll probably tell you I’m passionate. That passion should not be confused with being over-zealous or being immoveable from a particular perspective, though. Much of the passion I bring is because I have thought deeply, considered options and developed a conclusion…but that’s not to say that with input from others and a well-reasoned perspective, I cannot be influenced and enlightened to a new perspective. My passion, vigor and energy are traits which help me as a leader. In my career, I’ve been looked to as a thought leader, because I’ve been given the ability to quickly understand a situation and evaluate it critically. This style of thinking means I’m not afraid to ask tough questions of an idea or proposal. Again, ask anyone who’s worked with me and they’ll tell you I’m anything but a “yes” man…but this is not to say that I’m contrary for the sake of being contrary. The skillset is deployed as needed and as a member of the Board and your President-Elect, I view it as my job to not only ask those questions, but be able to answer them and encourage constructive dialogue when critical issues come before the Board. It’s not lost on me and I hope not on you that the Brother you elect in Phoenix will take over the Fraternity as it enters its next century. This responsibility is one that doesn’t frighten me, but excites me. It’s true, we have so much we need to do as an organization, but the work in front of us will be the foundation upon which we start our next 100 years. I want to be your President-elect…I want to be the first President to kick off our next 100 years of our Brotherhood.

Jeremiah King

Missouri S&T '02 Brinkmann Constructors: Civil Engineer and Project Manager

Jeremiah served two terms as Chapter President at Alpha Omega Chapter (Missouri University of Science and Technology.) He was Alpha Omega Chapter Active of the Semester three times, Dent Man of the Year Finalist, Alpha Omega Alumni Association President, and Secretary. At the national level, he served as a District Director and Regional Vice President. He is a Notable Morris Fellow of the Wilson C. Morris Fellowship of honored Foundation donors.

Q: Over the past decade, Sig Tau has taken many steps to build a strong foundation for a successful future. What action(s) by the Fraternity in recent years do you believe is (are) the most critical to it building a strong, successful future? What are the implications of that action?
A: I believe the emphasis on programming (Webb Academy, National Meetings, Noble Man Institute, etc.) for the Undergraduates is the most critical to building a strong, successful future. Without the Undergraduates, the Fraternity would not be where it is today. While every Chapter is unique in their own way, the Fraternity’s programming is what ties them all together. For example, regardless of time of year for RUSH that a campus may dictate, recruitment of potential members does not change. Once the potential members become associate members, they are associate members of Sig Tau, not just a single Chapter. This continues to active member and alumni member. Giving the Undergraduates this solid foundation is what will provide the Fraternity with a solid foundation to continue building a strong, successful future.

Q: What do you believe is the most critical external challenge faced by the Fraternity? How should Sig Tau position itself to successfully deal with this challenge?
A: Without a doubt, I see negative press coverage as the most critical external challenge faced by the Fraternity. This isn’t just negative press coverage of Sig Tau, but of the entire Greek community across the country, both Fraternity and Sorority. As I’m sure everyone has noticed, when a Fraternity or Sorority does something not in line with the values of the Greek community, that news is broadcast far and wide and the coverage and subsequent discussion eventually moves to what purpose the Greek Community plays in today’s society. I believe Sig Tau has already begun to deal with this challenge with the recently revised Member Safety and Wellness Policy that has been implemented. Furthermore, this policy is thoroughly reviewed within the programming for the Undergraduates and their buy-in is actively sought and received. But moving forward, the emphasis on this Policy needs to continue to be followed and every member (undergraduate, alumni, staff, etc.) needs to adhere to what it requires of us. Additionally, greater collaboration with the greater Greek community as a whole will help ensure we are all doing as much as we can to educate our members on the importance of membership safety and wellness. It’s important to note that this isn’t meant to restrict the Greek community, but to enable it to continue the good each individual Fraternity and Sorority is known for. Furthermore, a positive publicity program would help to counter the negative press coverage and fill the newsreels with the good that both Sig Tau and the Greek community do. The Fraternity could put out news items, from time to time, that highlight the positive things that Sig Tau on the national and Chapter level has done. This could also serve as a potential volunteer position for an Alumni that does Public Relations for a living.

Q: What career or life experiences you have had that would most beneficially contribute to the deliberations and decisions of the Board?
A: In my profession, I am responsible for managing multiple projects at a time and each one presents a new challenge. When a problem is discovered, it is human instinct to execute the first solution we arrive at. I am fortunate enough to work for a company that focuses on thinking outside the box to find solutions. The founder of my company often says, “If you’re not looking for creative ideas, you’ll never find any.” This mindset has taught me to stop, step back, take another look, and reevaluate the situation. More often than not, the best solution is the third or fourth idea that comes to mind. I come from a big family where I am the fourth of six children, four of which are men, so I was fortunate enough to experience brotherhood from the day I was born. Needless to say, we never got along 100% of the time and looking back it was very similar to my life in the Chapter house. I came to realize that Sigma Tau Gamma is a family, too, and although we might have our disagreements, we all wanted what was best for the group as a whole. The only real disagreement was debate over how best to attain it. It all comes down to this: No brother wishes something bad to befall Sigma Tau Gamma, but quite the opposite. Every brother in Sigma Tau Gamma deeply cares for the organization and wants it to succeed. Unfortunately, not every brother will agree on what path to follow to ensure success. I believe that my career and life experiences have taught me how to be able to cross the divides, integrate different opinions, search for creative solutions, and help us all find the common ground that will bring us continued success.

Q: What item(s) in the 2020 Strategic Plan do you think is (are) most important? What item(s) would you change?
A: One of the most important items is Membership Development, the programming that we offer to the Undergraduates. It goes back to being able to tie it all into one Sig Tau as well as providing the Fraternity with a solid foundation to grow. Another important item is the Foundation. In order to provide top-notch programming, we need to have the funds to provide these educational benefits. Instilling in all members, whether active or alumni, the importance of giving back will help set the example for future members.

Q: If you could ask a candidate for the Board any one question, what would it be? Please provide your own answer to that question.
Q: What do you believe is the purview of the Board of Directors?
A: The Board of Directors is not meant to manage the day to day operations of the Fraternity, that responsibility falls on the CEO and the staff he employs. The Board of Directors are there to govern the Fraternity between meetings of the Grand Conclave. Put another way, the Board of Directors provides the ends while the CEO determines the means. A lot of the responsibility is to look at where the Fraternity needs to be in the next 5, 10, or 20 years and letting the CEO determine the best way to get there.

Joseph Gallo

Michigan Tech. '08 Dow Corning Corporation: Maintenance Engineer

Joe was elected to Vice President of Membership in 2009, Chapter President in 2010, and other various positions throughout. In spring 2012, Gallo received the Gamma Chi chapter’s Man of the Year Award, recognizing his dedication to the organization. Following that, in August 2012 at the Grand Chapter in Washington D.C., he was presented the National Ellsworth C. Dent "Man of the Year Award". From 2012 to 2014, Gallo advised the Central Michigan University, Psi Chapter, and held a brief District Director role. In 2016, he was elected to the Board of Directors as a Director-At-Large.

Q: Over the past decade, Sig Tau has taken many steps to build a strong foundation for a successful future. What action(s) by the Fraternity in recent years do you believe is (are) the most critical to it building a strong, successful future? What are the implications of that action?
A: A few major steps that we’ve taken in recent years are the relocation of the Sigma Tau Gamma headquarters, development and creation of our national housing company (WPN), and revamping our educational system and expectations for our organization. When I look at a strong foundation, the one that stands out to me the most is the revamping of our educational programs offered to undergraduates and alumni alike. Sigma Tau Gamma’s success is based on the involvement of its undergraduate brothers, and continued involvement of its alumni. The educational opportunities range anywhere from new member oriented (Nobleman Institute), Executive Cabinet leadership (Earl A. Webb Academy of Principled Leaders), and to full nation-wide involvement at our Grand Conclave. Not only are our members better educated from these well-planned programs, but they bring that much more excitement and creativity back to each of their individual chapters. The experiences that the undergraduates and alumni alike have, are what shape Sigma Tau Gamma to have long-term success, continued involvement and giving, and industry-leading personal development within Fraternity and Sorority life.

Q: What do you believe is the most critical external challenge faced by the Fraternity? Explain why. How should Sig Tau position itself to successfully deal with this challenge?
A: Depending who you talk to, fraternities and sororities are a dying breed in an industry filled with hazing, sexual assault, and predominantly negative media coverage. The most critical external challenge faced by fraternities is the ever-pressing question as to, “are they still relevant?”. Sigma Tau Gamma can be most successful in this realm, by continuing to push forward with the firm belief that status quo is not acceptable. That if we want to survive, we need to be industry leaders, not industry followers. We need to develop our members into collegiate, and community leaders, to ensure that our peers know that Sig Tau helped them be who they are today. We need to set the example of excellence, and ideals. We need to break the stereotypes of those set before us, despite how difficult that may be. Only we as an organization, from the ground up, can overcome this challenge.

Q: What career or life experiences you have had that would most beneficially contribute to the deliberations and decisions of the Board?
A: As I’ve been part of the Board of Directors since 2016, I bring a personality of openness, healthy debate, and enthusiasm during every meeting. Having an engineering background, I am a logical thinker, with common sense to take calculated risks through thorough discussion. Throughout my career, I’ve worked daily to troubleshoot problems and plan for long-term success. I’ve interfaced with large groups, and have had extremely difficult one-on-one conversations. I fulfill every one of my roles with passion and the commitment that I am here to give it every ounce of energy I have. The personal opportunities that I’ve been given through Sigma Tau Gamma, my career, and other organizations are what shape my decisions, in the hope that those who succeed me were given the same, if not better opportunities than myself.

Q: What item(s) in the 2020 Strategic Plan do you think is (are) most important? What item(s) would you change?
A: All aspects of the 2020 Strategic Plan are important, but the ones that really stand out to me are: Membership Development, Growth, Alumni and Parent Engagement, and Foundation. These goals really tie together in a manner of overall success. As we push to have a thriving foundation, we really need to look at where we stand from membership involvement. If members were not given opportunities to be involved, or alumni forgotten, your foundation crumbles. There needs to be a way to keep the interest, to engage members to ask more questions, to really have them understand that Sigma Tau Gamma is more than just college, it is for life. Through great membership development and our educational programs, we can do that. Starting the excitement right out the gates, and continuing through their undergraduate career no longer makes it seem like a one-off, but more of an expectation. The challenge is engagement. Sig Tau needs to go the max, offer everything we possibly can to get people hooked. Getting people hooked is what continues the excitement, continues engagement, and then hopefully continues the foundation. As for things I would change, I don’t think people realize how important it is to acquire top talent for our staff. Staffing also reflects the personality and the life of Sigma Tau Gamma. Whether it is campus recruiting for an expansion, our educational programs, or being the face of the organization, who we choose and hopefully retain on staff is critical. These are folks teaching our undergraduates, calling our alumni, solving our everyday operational problems. It is listed in our 2020 Strategic Plan, and it is the first bullet, but bringing it to the forefront and helping people understand is critical to our success.

Q: If you could ask a candidate for the Board any one question, what would it be? Please provide your own answer to that question.
Q: If you had a magic wand, and knowing everything you know now, what would you have changed as an undergraduate of Sigma Tau Gamma in your own chapter?
A: I would have helped my brothers understand that Sigma Tau Gamma is more than college, it is for life. Learning doesn’t stop after you graduate, and with everything we do now with the organization, there is so much more we can do to help! Post-college involvement isn’t for everyone, but for some, it is, they just need to be given the opportunity.

Scott Kaspar

Illinois '96 Kaspar Law Company: Registered Patent Attorney & Trial Lawyer

Scott served as Chapter President, Vice President of Membership, Vice President of Programming and Social Chair for the Alpha Chi Chapter at Illinois. While serving his chapter, they received the Edward H. McCune Award in 1998. Scott has been an active member of the Alpha Chi Alumni Association since 1998, was a part of the Board of Advisors for two years, and is currently a Foundation Trustee.

Q: Over the past decade, Sig Tau has taken many steps to build a strong foundation for a successful future. What action(s) by the Fraternity in recent years do you believe is (are) the most critical to it building a strong, successful future? What are the implications of that action?
A: Consistent with the Strategic Plan, Sig Tau has taken huge steps to create a solid platform upon which it will not only survive the next 100 years, but will grow and propel itself into the upper echelon of fraternities. While there are many important aspects of the strategic vision that have fostered this growth, I believe they can be best categorized as two fundamental steps. First, the Sig Tau headquarters has retained top talent in recent years, notably CEO Steve Latour, who has helped the Fraternity find its vision, but also develop an infrastructure that can serve the marketing and financial needs of the fraternity, as well as provide support to chapters and new associate chapters. It is no surprise that, with this headquarters’ staff in place, the Fraternity has had the resources to dramatically expand in recent years. In addition to bringing top-notch personnel on board, Sig Tau also is moving its headquarters into a highly-functional, and stately, space in Indianapolis that will position Sig Tau among the top fraternities and help the headquarters’ staff have the facilities necessary to usher in the next era. I believe moving the Sig Tau headquarters to Indianapolis, though bold, is the right decision in ensuring our long-term strength. Second, the Fraternity has taken great steps to reach out to its alumni in recent years, to reconnect with alumni and get them excited about giving again to the Fraternity and the Foundation. In order to make the capital improvements listed above (notably, the new headquarters), the Fraternity needs to grow and expand its fundraising capabilities. We have many wealthy alumni, though I would venture to guess that only a small percentage of them regularly contribute to the Fraternity and the Foundation. Recent campaigns have been hugely successful, and as Brothers learn about the strategic vision, the new headquarters, and the renewed and reinvigorated Fraternity, I expect we will see alumni support increase. Building the right infrastructure and solidifying alumni support will help the Fraternity achieve its strategic vision and move the Fraternity into the next era.

Q: What do you believe is the most critical external challenge faced by the Fraternity? Explain why. How should Sig Tau position itself to successfully deal with this challenge?
A: Nationally, fraternities have been struggling the past two decades to find a place of relevance on college campuses and to move away from the age-old stereotypes that fraternities only foster alcohol and substance abuse, hazing, sexual abuse, sexism, racism, homophobia, and other societal illnesses. While none of us would include Sig Tau in the same category of other fraternities that have struggled very publicly with these issues (for example, the Beta Theta Pi chapter at Penn State), the notoriety of these horrible instances affects all fraternities’ recruitment, including Sig Tau. One aspect of Sig Tau that really attracted me to the Fraternity as an undergrad was that Sig Tau has always championed leadership and promoting healthy life skills, which has continued to impact me since. As just a couple examples, the first day I walked into the Alpha Chi Chapter at the University of Illinois, I was introduced to Alyx Parker, then chapter president, who shared with me his background in Scouting and his love for the University and the Fraternity. Alyx’s father, a Vet Med professor, was our chapter adviser and a well-known voice in the community. The composition of the brotherhood at the Alpha Chi Chapter was uniquely different than other fraternities that I had visited. Alpha Chi’s recruiting theme that year was “Men of Substance,” and it was true. As I became more involved in the Fraternity, and eventually became chapter president, I had the opportunity to attend the Webb Academy for newly-elected presidents. That was my first time at the Warrensburg headquarters, where I got to meet so many who have served as pillars in the Fraternity. Notably, the Webb Academy that I attended was led by D.W. Cole, who gave a series of lectures on developing leadership skills that have guided many of my life’s decisions since. After attending the Webb Academy, I knew that my experience with the Alpha Chi Chapter was not unlike the Fraternity as a whole. Rather, it confirmed my belief that Sig Tau is a fundamentally different fraternity. Turning back to the question, the way forward for Sig Tau to demonstrate its relevance on college campuses and avoid the pitfalls of other fraternities lies in our rich history of championing our Principles and using our programming to continue to help our Brothers develop leadership skills to become Noble Men. In recent years, we have added additional academies and programming which have received very positive feedback. We also have strengthened the roles of chapter advisers, as well as increased the number and frequency of headquarters’ staff in regular contact with the chapters. Our long history of education and programming is what has distinguished Sig Tau from the pack. Continuing and expanding these programs is our way forward.

Q: What career or life experiences you have had that would most beneficially contribute to the deliberations and decisions of the Board?
A: I have been a lawyer for the past 15 years primarily handling patent litigation. As with any litigation, I spent the majority of my time talking with witnesses and studying the evidence, and then presenting that information before judges and juries to try to explain how the train fell off the tracks. Patent litigation adds a further difficulty to the process because it often involves technologies that are beyond the average juror and judge. The process forced me to become a teacher of something complex and to distill it down into concepts anyone could understand, in an effort to bring forth the truth in any given case. I don’t expect to carry out any jury trials with the Board, but I feel I have been uniquely qualified by my experiences to analyze complex problems and help others come to a common understanding. Only when we have analyzed all of the pieces of a puzzle can we begin to understand how each piece fits together to create something bigger and more beautiful. Being a lawyer has helped me to hone my critical thinking skills. It also has helped me to develop great time management skills, which have allowed me to excel both as a lawyer but also as a husband and father of two children. I also have served on a number of Boards over the years, in which I have worked with others to address and resolve problems, manage and grow financial resources, fundraise, among other functions typical of any Board. Notably, and most recently, I have served as a Trustee on the Foundation Board of Trustees for the Fraternity. While I have not been on the Foundation Board that long, I believe some of my strengths have been recognized, and certainly my enthusiasm for the position and its work has been transparent. Prior to being a part of the Board of Trustees, I served for a couple years on the Board of Advisors and regularly participated in phone calls and attended the meetings at Grand Chapter in Orlando. Other Board positions that I have held include president of various homeowners’ associations (including a large 9-building association in downtown Chicago, from 2006-2012), as well as a tourism and merchants board in Beaver Creek, Colorado.

Q: What item(s) in the 2020 Strategic Plan do you think is (are) most important? What item(s) would you change?
A: Consistent with my answer to the first bullet point above, I believe the aspects of the Strategic Plan that will provide us with the infrastructure and fuel to achieve the next 100 years are: • Recruitment and Growth – notably, Objective 1.2, expanding the membership by 25%, and Section 1.5, raising $2M in donations (and utilizing the Foundation as the vehicle for those donations); and • Alumni & Parent Engagement – notably, Objective 2.1, increasing connections with Alumni. Recruitment is important to build the next generation and future generations to come, but we also need to continue to tap into our alumni to foster their support and financial resources to fund our expansion, headquarters relocation, and other major endeavors. Reengaging our alumni is important to our future and the financial health of the Fraternity and Foundation. We have brought the Fraternity to an exciting point, where we have grown the number of chapters and brought Sig Tau back to campuses where our chapters once had been shuttered. We have a bold new headquarters building well positioned in the Greek community in Indianapolis. This growth is not without its cost, but we now have much more to offer our alumni, to get them reconnected, and to win over their pride and support for the Fraternity and the generation ahead. As a result of rebuilding and reconnecting with our alumni, we will see our resources grow, and the Fraternity and Foundation will be strengthened and poised to tackle the challenges of tomorrow. There is nothing about the Strategic Plan that I would change, at least not at this time. I think it is a bold vision, and we are seeing the positive impact of its implementation. In fact, the various pieces of the Strategic Plan drive or build upon one another. For instance, in order to enhance our operations and grow our number of chapters, we need the help of alumni. The WPN Housing Corporation also feeds into this equation because it provides an additional revenue stream to fund our growth and alumni outreach.

Q: If you could ask a candidate for the Board any one question, what would it be? Please provide your own answer to that question.
Q: What will you do to help achieve the Strategic Plan?
A: I would answer that question as follows: Should I be elected as a Board member, I will work my tail off on all Board matters and make my service to the Fraternity a high priority. I will seek to discern those aspects of the Strategic Plan for which my skills and experiences would make a great fit, and I will engage in those aspects to push the Fraternity forward. Based on my work for the Board of Trustees, reaching out to alumni has been an interest that suits my personality, and I expect alumni engagement and fundraising to be specific matters that I could spearhead as a Board member. Not only would I work tirelessly to implement the Strategic Plan, but I would work to constantly reassess the Strategic Plan to be sure that it is addressing the Fraternity’s needs and ushering in the anticipated changes and improvements. Where evidence suggests that aspects of the Strategic Plan are not working, I will advocate specific changes to the Plan in those areas. Of equal importance, I will work collegially with the Board members, and CEO Steve Latour, to continue to promote the Principles and discover and build upon those areas of common understanding. We are a Fraternity, a great one at that, and I believe we can accomplish our Strategic Plan while at the same time becoming stronger Brothers together.

Paul Phillips III

Southeastern Lousiana '91 Ernst & Young: Partner and Tax Markets Leader

Paul was initiated in 1991 and served his chapter as the Vice President of Programs and new member educator while he was an undergraduate. Upon graduation, Paul became an active member in the New Orleans Alumni Chapter and became a Chapter Advisor for the Phi Chapter. Paul served as Treasurer for the New Orleans Alumni Chapter, and also was a regional volunteer. Currently, Paul serves as a Trustee on the Foundation Board of Trustees and has since 2012.

Q: Over the past decade, Sig Tau has taken many steps to build a strong foundation for a successful future. What action(s) by the Fraternity in recent years do you believe is (are) the most critical to it building a strong, successful future? What are the implications of that action?
A: In narrowing the various steps into one strategic accomplishment that helped to ensure a strong foundation for a successful future I would state that the growth of the Fraternity, in terms of additional chapters and increasing members per chapter, has been the most important strategic accomplishment (I also acknowledge that this accomplishment is not complete as additional expansion is warranted). Executing growth as the first goal of our strategic plan has enabled and empowered Sigma Tau Gamma to have a differentiated message of brotherhood and helped us create a sense of belonging for the next generation of noble men. In other words – “there is nothing in the world that breeds success like success,” Bob Ross – Having the first few expansion opportunities gave us the confidence to push for more and having that confidence within leadership set a tone that cascaded across Sigma Tau Gamma’s brotherhood, elevating the fraternity for many years to come. Additionally, growth has strengthen business of the fraternity. By expanding our base into different geographies and school sizes we have strengthened the fraternity via better dispersion and diversification of risk and through a wider revenue base. Having economies of scale and bargaining power drives efficiencies, which help the fraternity compete in delivering a high value per member.

Q: What do you believe is the most critical external challenge faced by the Fraternity? How should Sig Tau position itself to successfully deal with this challenge?
A: I believe the most critical external challenge is the occurrence of risk events, or losses due to a failure of proper risk management protocols and the negative publicity that may follow, this is regardless of if the event was related to Sigma Tau Gamma. We have already seen the impact that risk occurrences may have and the aftermath of media coverage. In today’s environment events can be uploaded real time and go viral in a matter of hours, if not minutes; additionally, the public is often allowed to make judgement on matters without knowing the context of the streaming video or the full facts of an event. I believe that we have done a good job in strengthening our own risk management protocols and that our culture has migrated toward being risk adverse in areas including hazing, alcohol abuse and sexual misconduct. Granted there is always work to be done as any skill, once obtained, needs practice and refinement. Accordingly, I would see Sig Tau has continuing its risk management journey while at the same time developing an offensive media relations plan. Being proactive in messaging and getting the good stuff in front of the media may condition the audience to not be as reactive when (and unfortunately it is probably when and not if) another risk event occurs.

Q: What career or life experiences you have had that would most beneficially contribute to the deliberations and decisions of the Board?
A: The most immediate skill set that I hope to contribute is my experience as a CPA, business consultant, and MBA. Given my 25 years of experience within public accounting, 13 of which are as a partner of a “Big 4” global firm, I have had thousands of opportunities to interact with executives of hundreds of companies, many within the Fortune 500. I believe my strength is the ability to break down various complicated rules and explain them in simple English, this combined with my true desire to find solutions rather than problems. In addition to my accounting and finance skill set, I also hope that my experience with other non-profit boards, including the Sigma Tau Gamma Foundation, will provide me with value-added insights that I can add to the conversations and deliberations of the Board of Directors.

Q: What item(s) in the 2020 Strategic Plan do you think is (are) most important? What item(s) would you change?
A: I previously mentioned Growth as being the most important strategic accomplishment; however, it is not the most important item in the 2020 Strategic Plan. The most important item is the casting of our vision as it truly does help to guide and focus organizational efforts – Building Noble Generations of Men. This is followed by our purpose – To be a fraternity of courageous and noble gentlemen who always endeavor forward. Each of these statements builds on each other and builds towards our principles. Layering in courageous emphasizes that we are steadfast in our resolve, likewise with endeavor which highlights that we will push hard to achieve. Then ending with forwarding focuses us on our path as one which advances in a positive direction. I don’t have any items that I would change within the 2020 Strategic Plan; however, if I were to ask this question a little differently and state what do I think is missing I would go back to the risk management discussion from as I highlighted in my response to question 2. I believe that we should recognize how far we have come in this regard, but I also believe this to be a significant risk and thus I would have expected to see a goal articulated within the Strategic Plan that discussed objectives around risk management – even if the objective was to acknowledge the successful policies that were previously implemented and report out good results.

Q: If you could ask a candidate for the Board any one question, what would it be? Please provide your own answer to that question.
Q: I would probably ask them what do you like to do for fun?
A: My answer is it changes every few years but currently I am really into two different things – I love running all-terrain races and am looking to complete the Spartan TriFecta in 2018 as well as run a couple more Tough Mudder challenges. My other current love is soccer and I am playing on adult indoor and outdoor leagues, with outdoor being my favorite.

Mike Ray

Youngstown State '01 City of Youngstown & AEP: Councilman & Technical Service Supervisor

Mike was a Founding Father of the Chapter at Youngstown State, served as Vice President of Programs and served as the point of contact for the Youngstown State Chartering banquet. As an alumnus, he served as Director of Chapter Development, Headquarters Staff, Development Director, Sigma Tau Gamma Foundation, District Director, Regional Vice President, and served as a Board of Directors Member for four years. Mike has also served as an alumni advisor for the Beta Gamma Chapter and served as President of the Beta Gamma Alumni Association.

Q: Over the past decade, Sig Tau has taken many steps to build a strong foundation for a successful future. What action(s) by the Fraternity in recent years do you believe is (are) the most critical to it building a strong, successful future? What are the implications of that action?
A: Expansion and rebranding has been critical to our success in recent years. Undoubtedly, this will continue to be the most important strategic priority for Sig Tau. Over the past few years, we have reaped the benefits of successful expansion and rebranding. I believe we will continue to do so. It has been said, “a rising tide lifts all boats.” The same holds true for the momentum our hard effort has created. This momentum must be used to propel the Fraternity into its second century. Continuing to grow Sig Tau will provide the necessary capital resources to continue to improve programs and services at all levels. Simply stated, expansion leads to more revenue, which opens the door to investment in programming and staff personnel. Additional resources through growth will afford us the ability to tackle challenges that we face with chapter housing needs, alumni engagement, ongoing chapter support, and philanthropy. With successful focus on continued growth, we will have the ability to invest in various levels of organizational infrastructure, from new chapters to alumni associations and everything in between.

Q: What do you believe is the most critical external challenge faced by the Fraternity? How should Sig Tau position itself to successfully deal with this challenge?
A: A general shift in the attitudes toward Greek Life is the biggest external challenge that the Fraternity will face over the next several years. Students are more connected and engaged on college campus than ever before in history. Today, there are many distractions and opportunities for engagement beyond Greek Life. Traditional, boring programming is no longer attractive to modern students. Additionally, many institutions are reexamining the role of Greek Life on campus. Sig Tau must be proactive to combat these shifting attitudes. With respect to students, we must continue to create programing and a membership program that is not only relevant but also engages our members. With respect to our host institutions, we must ensure that we are able to adapt to the changing expectations on college campuses. We must provide the type of fraternity experience that will create value for the host institution and will make Sig Tau a desirable member of the campus community. This can be achieved through a well-rounded program that includes strong membership development, philanthropic involvement, and a responsible housing presence on campus.

Q: What career or life experiences you have had that would most beneficially contribute to the deliberations and decisions of the Board?
A: As Director of Chapter Development for the Headquarters staff, I spent three years on the road working directly with our chapters. I conducted more than 120 chapter service visits during that time. After leaving the Headquarters staff, I immediately seized the opportunity to become the part-time Development Director for the Sigma Tau Gamma Foundation and worked with alumni to launch the EBE Capital Campaign. Following my professional service to the fraternity, I was eager to embrace other opportunities as an alumni volunteer. I first served as Erie Shores District Director for four years before having the pleasure of serving as the Three Rivers Regional Vice President. From 2010 to 2014, I previously served on the Board of Directors. For the last four years, I have served as the advisor and housing corporation director for the Beta Gamma chapter, where I was a founding father. Working closely with undergraduate members from my home chapter has kept me grounded and allowed me to reconnect with the true needs of our undergraduates. My fraternal experience has been parlayed into many successes in my personal, professional and political life. In addition to my business career, I have served for two terms as a Councilman for the City of Youngstown, as well as a trustee for two charitable foundations.

Q: What item(s) in the 2020 Strategic Plan do you think is (are) most important? What item(s) would you change?
A: Expansion and membership development are two areas where Sig Tau has set the industry benchmark. Sig Tau has quickly become the inter-fraternal leader in chapter expansion and membership development. Our 2020 Strategic Plan was a bold, forward-thinking decision that resulted in a historical increase in chapters and membership. However, this success cannot be one-sided. Sufficient chapter support on the back-end is a must. One area that we should strive to improve is ongoing chapter support. We need to provide the necessary guidance and support to our chapters so they can operate more efficiently and effectively. Dedicating the necessary manpower and resources to chapter service is a necessity; because chapter service succeeds when carried out by professional headquarters staff members in conjunction with trained alumni volunteers. Further, with the founding of larger chapters at prominent Greek schools, the need for quality support services will balloon. We must develop procedures to ensure that once chapters are established, they can be maintained with not only with personnel support but also sustainable infrastructure. Integrating cutting-edge membership development programing is only one part of that. Additional direct chapter support will result in fuller, more-robust chapters that exemplify and practice the values of Sig Tau as the organization continues to grow.

Q: If you could ask a candidate for the Board any one question, what would it be? Please provide your own answer to that question.
Q: As a member of the Board what type of perspective would you bring to the organization?
A: I am running for the Board to ensure that the voices of all our membership are heard. As you can read within this application, my experience with Sig Tau is as extensive as it is broad. I’ve been a founding father, an advisor, a regional officer, a staff member, and a director. I have a deep understanding and passion for our organization. Past experiences have given me an honest and holistic knowledge of how the fraternity works at the local, regional, and national level. Previously serving on the Board of Directors was a great privilege, but most recently acting as chapter advisor for the last four years has allowed me to reconnect with the needs of our undergraduate members. My vast fraternal experience is deeply rooted in working with and providing service to our undergraduate membership. My perspective is one that is needed on our Board. I love our organization and I strive each day to exemplify our principles.